UNCTAD short courses on Key Issues on the International Economic Agenda
for Geneva-based Diplomats
Palais des Nations, Geneva
The UNCTAD short courses on Key Issues on the International Economic Agenda for Geneva-based Diplomats provide an opportunity for delegates to learn about current and emerging issues, and to dialogue with UNCTAD researchers in an academic setting.
The success of the first two short courses in 2004 and 2005 led member states to request their continuation and expansion. The result was the launching in 2007 of two semesters of half-day courses delivered monthly.
The programme of the courses is demand-driven: the diplomats themselves propose areas on which they require updated information. Their suggestions are the basis for the development of courses on emerging topics on which UNCTAD and its individual divisions conduct research work.

For the first semester of 2014, the Knowledge Development Branch (KD Branch) has organised the following lectures for you: (1) Rethinking the Global Development Agenda: A 50-Year Perspective; (2) Information and Communications Technologies for Development: The Cloud Economy and Developing Countries; and (3) UNCTAD Programme on Non-tariff Measures in World Trade. The lectures for the second semester will be announced later this year

For the first semester of 2013, the Knowledge Sharing, Training Capacity Development Branch (KSTCD Branch) has organised the following lectures for you: (1) Global income and trade trends: Implications for export opportunities for developing countries; (2) Trade Logistics, Transport, Trade Facilitation and Customs automation: issues and UNCTAD's role; and (3) New Generation of Investment Policies for Sustainable Development. The lectures for the second semester will be announced later this year.
In 2012, the lectures for the short course series in the first semester will cover: (1) International Investment Agreements and Development; (2) Information and Communication Technologies for Development; (3) The impacts of the international crises on the economies of the LDCs. Courses for the second semester will be announced later this year.
In 2011, the lectures for the short course series covered: (1) Governance, development and LDCs; (2) Industrial policy and productive integration; (3) Sovereign debt and debt crises; (4) Reform of the international financial architecture; (5) The general state of food security and agricultural commodity markets in developing countries; (6) Science, technology and innovation for development: Key policy issue.
The 2010 short course series covered the following areas: (1) Migration and development; (2) Trade agreements between developing and developed countries; (3) Transport and trade facilitation: infrastructure and services to enhance the competitiveness of landlocked and transit developing countries; (4) Millenium Development Goals; (5) Living in a carbon-constrained future: trade and development implications of climate change; (6) South-South cooperation.
Short courses in the 2009 Series covered the following subjects: (1) Financial Crisis; (2) Bridging the Technology Gap; (3) Investment Promotion; (4) Energy in the 21st century: the emerging biofuels market and its development implications; (5) Non-Tariff Barriers: UNCTAD's new initiative; and (6) Investor-State dispute settlement
The short courses series in 2008 covered: (1) Aid for Trade; (2) Adapting to the New Energy Realities; (3) Addressing the Global Food Crisis; (4) SMES in the Global Value Chain; (5) Explaining the Capital Flow Paradox; (6) Trade and Environment.
In 2007 the short courses offered were on: (1) Managing Global Integration and Interdependence; (2) Building Productive Capacities in LDCs as a means to reducing Poverty; (3) Promoting Growth and Development through ICTs; (4) Enhancing Competitiveness through Trade and Transport Facilitation; (5) Attracting FDI through IIAs; (6) The Interface between Competition Policy, Trade, Investment and Development.